sculptures



HAWAIʻI - THE NATIVES ARE NOT HAPPY

Lorem Ipsum

ANGEL OF DEATH

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MEETING OF THE GODS

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ISLAND REALITIES

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EXHIBITION IN BERLIN, GERMANY

DIGGING IN THE PLOT OF EXISTENCE

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NERTHUS
 

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DREAMER
 

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ANCESTOR
 

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TROLL
 

AT THE COURT OF THE TYRANT

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DEMON
 

Photo credits: Björn Albert, Ulrich Pini,  Jan Ung and Andreas-Michael Velten



about

about

ARTIST’S STATEMENT
As a sculptor, I consider the greatest cultural achievement of the ancient Hawaiians to be their wood sculpture. Vivid are my memories of the fierce temple figures I saw at Honolulu’s Bishop Museum as a schoolboy. They haunted my dreams and they kindled my passion for the visual arts. My sculptures are the fruit of that experience.

Although I am an ethnic European, I cannot envision any serious treatment of the islands without addressing the fate of the Hawaiians and their culture since the arrival of the first Europeans in 1778. This approach demands that I also address the nature of Western colonialism, especially as practiced by European-Americans since the arrival of the first Christian missionaries in 1820.

Hawaiians, both the living and their ancestors, embody for me the soul of the islands. Their echo still resounds in the landscape, a landscape increasingly disfigured by over-development. I speak of disfigurement, but for Hawaiians it is undoubtedly a desecration. The difference is crucial. For whom is the land sacred, for whom is it only a commodity to be exploited for profit?

How does one address two centuries of decimation and humiliation?
With grief and with anger.

CV

contact

William Hanson
Oslo, Norway

info[at]hanson-art.com